Balakrishnan Chandrasekaran

Balakrishnan Chandrasekaran

Address
Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik
Saarland Informatics Campus
Campus E1 4
66123 Saarbrücken
Location
E1 4 - Room 517
Phone
+49 681 9325 3513
Fax
+49 681 9325 3599
Email
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Personal Information

Publications

2019
Chung, T., Aben, E., Bruijnzeels, T., Chandrasekaran, B., Choffnes, D. R., Levin, D., … Sullivan, N. (2019). RPKI is Coming of Age: A Longitudinal Study of RPKI Deployment and Invalid Route Origins. In IMC’19, ACM Internet Measurement Conference. Amsterdam, Netherlands: ACM. doi:10.1145/3355369.3355596
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BibTeX
@inproceedings{Chung_IMC2019, TITLE = {{RPKI} is Coming of Age: {A} Longitudinal Study of {RPKI} Deployment and Invalid Route Origins}, AUTHOR = {Chung, Taejoong and Aben, Emile and Bruijnzeels, Tim and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Choffnes, David R. and Levin, Dave and Maggs, Bruce M. and Mislove, Alan and van Rijswijk-Deij, Roland and Rula, John P. and Sullivan, Nick}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, ISBN = {978-1-4503-6948-0}, DOI = {10.1145/3355369.3355596}, PUBLISHER = {ACM}, YEAR = {2019}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, BOOKTITLE = {IMC'19, ACM Internet Measurement Conference}, PAGES = {406--419}, ADDRESS = {Amsterdam, Netherlands}, }
Endnote
%0 Conference Proceedings %A Chung, Taejoong %A Aben, Emile %A Bruijnzeels, Tim %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Choffnes, David R. %A Levin, Dave %A Maggs, Bruce M. %A Mislove, Alan %A van Rijswijk-Deij, Roland %A Rula, John P. %A Sullivan, Nick %+ External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations %T RPKI is Coming of Age: A Longitudinal Study of RPKI Deployment and Invalid Route Origins : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-7678-0 %R 10.1145/3355369.3355596 %D 2019 %B ACM Internet Measurement Conference %Z date of event: 2019-10-21 - 2019-10-23 %C Amsterdam, Netherlands %B IMC'19 %P 406 - 419 %I ACM %@ 978-1-4503-6948-0
Motamedi, R., Yeganeh, B., Chandrasekaran, B., Rejaie, R., Maggs, B. M., & Willinger, W. (2019). On Mapping the Interconnections in Today’s Internet. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 27(5). doi:10.1109/TNET.2019.2940369
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@article{Motamedi_2019, TITLE = {On Mapping the Interconnections in Today's Internet}, AUTHOR = {Motamedi, Reza and Yeganeh, Bahador and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Rejaie, Reza and Maggs, Bruce M. and Willinger, Walter}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, ISSN = {1558-2566}, DOI = {10.1109/TNET.2019.2940369}, PUBLISHER = {IEEE}, ADDRESS = {Piscataway, NJ}, YEAR = {2019}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, DATE = {2019}, JOURNAL = {IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking}, VOLUME = {27}, NUMBER = {5}, PAGES = {2056}, }
Endnote
%0 Journal Article %A Motamedi, Reza %A Yeganeh, Bahador %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Rejaie, Reza %A Maggs, Bruce M. %A Willinger, Walter %+ External Organizations External Organizations Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations %T On Mapping the Interconnections in Today's Internet : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6B21-E %R 10.1109/TNET.2019.2940369 %7 2019 %D 2019 %J IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking %V 27 %N 5 %& 2056 %P 2056 %I IEEE %C Piscataway, NJ %@ false
2018
Chung, T., Lok, J., Chandrasekaran, B., Choffnes, D., Levin, D., Maggs, B. M., … Wilson, C. (2018). Is the Web Ready for OCSP Must-Staple? In IMC’18, Internet Measurement Conference. Boston, MA, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/3278532.3278543
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@inproceedings{Chung_IMC2018, TITLE = {Is the Web Ready for {OCSP} Must-Staple?}, AUTHOR = {Chung, Taejoong and Lok, Jay and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Choffnes, David and Levin, Dave and Maggs, Bruce M. and Mislove, Alan and Rula, John and Sullivan, Nick and Wilson, Christo}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, ISBN = {978-1-4503-5619-0}, DOI = {10.1145/3278532.3278543}, PUBLISHER = {ACM}, YEAR = {2018}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, DATE = {2018}, BOOKTITLE = {IMC'18, Internet Measurement Conference}, PAGES = {105--118}, ADDRESS = {Boston, MA, USA}, }
Endnote
%0 Conference Proceedings %A Chung, Taejoong %A Lok, Jay %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Choffnes, David %A Levin, Dave %A Maggs, Bruce M. %A Mislove, Alan %A Rula, John %A Sullivan, Nick %A Wilson, Christo %+ External Organizations External Organizations Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations %T Is the Web Ready for OCSP Must-Staple? : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BF11-4 %R 10.1145/3278532.3278543 %D 2018 %B Internet Measurement Conference %Z date of event: 2018-10-31 - 2018-11-02 %C Boston, MA, USA %B IMC'18 %P 105 - 118 %I ACM %@ 978-1-4503-5619-0
Bhattacherjee, D., Aqeel, W., Bozkurt, I. N., Aguirre, A., Chandrasekaran, B., Godfrey, P. B., … Singla, A. (2018). Gearing up for the 21st Century Space Race. In HotNets-VXIII. Redmond, WA, USA: ACM. doi:10.1145/3286062.3286079
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@inproceedings{Bhattacherjee_HotNets18, TITLE = {Gearing up for the 21st Century Space Race}, AUTHOR = {Bhattacherjee, Debopam and Aqeel, Waqar and Bozkurt, Ilker Nadi and Aguirre, Anthony and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Godfrey, P. Brighten and Laughlin, Gregory and Maggs, Bruce and Singla, Ankit}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, ISBN = {978-1-4503-6120-0}, DOI = {10.1145/3286062.3286079}, PUBLISHER = {ACM}, YEAR = {2018}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, DATE = {2018}, BOOKTITLE = {HotNets-VXIII}, PAGES = {113--119}, ADDRESS = {Redmond, WA, USA}, }
Endnote
%0 Conference Proceedings %A Bhattacherjee, Debopam %A Aqeel, Waqar %A Bozkurt, Ilker Nadi %A Aguirre, Anthony %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Godfrey, P. Brighten %A Laughlin, Gregory %A Maggs, Bruce %A Singla, Ankit %+ External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations %T Gearing up for the 21st Century Space Race : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BF0B-C %R 10.1145/3286062.3286079 %D 2018 %B ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks %Z date of event: 2018-11-15 - 2018-11-16 %C Redmond, WA, USA %B HotNets-VXIII %P 113 - 119 %I ACM %@ 978-1-4503-6120-0
Bozkurt, I. N., Aqeel, W., Bhattacherjee, D., Chandrasekaran, B., Godfrey, P. B., Laughlin, G., … Singla, A. (2018). Dissecting Latency in the Internet’s Fiber Infrastructure. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1811.10737
(arXiv: 1811.10737)
Abstract
The recent publication of the `InterTubes' map of long-haul fiber-optic cables in the contiguous United States invites an exciting question: how much faster would the Internet be if routes were chosen to minimize latency? Previous measurement campaigns suggest the following rule of thumb for estimating Internet latency: multiply line-of-sight distance by 2.1, then divide by the speed of light in fiber. But a simple computation of shortest-path lengths through the conduits in the InterTubes map suggests that the conversion factor for all pairs of the 120 largest population centers in the U.S.\ could be reduced from 2.1 to 1.3, in the median, even using less than half of the links. To determine whether an overlay network could be used to provide shortest paths, and how well it would perform, we used the diverse server deployment of a CDN to measure latency across individual conduits. We were surprised to find, however, that latencies are sometimes much higher than would be predicted by conduit length alone. To understand why, we report findings from our analysis of network latency data from the backbones of two Tier-1 ISPs, two scientific and research networks, and the recently built fiber backbone of a CDN.
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BibTeX
@online{Bozkurt_arXIv1811.10737, TITLE = {Dissecting Latency in the Internet's Fiber Infrastructure}, AUTHOR = {Bozkurt, Ilker Nadi and Aqeel, Waqar and Bhattacherjee, Debopam and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Godfrey, Philip Brighten and Laughlin, Gregory and Maggs, Bruce M. and Singla, Ankit}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, URL = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1811.10737}, EPRINT = {1811.10737}, EPRINTTYPE = {arXiv}, YEAR = {2018}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, ABSTRACT = {The recent publication of the `InterTubes' map of long-haul fiber-optic cables in the contiguous United States invites an exciting question: how much faster would the Internet be if routes were chosen to minimize latency? Previous measurement campaigns suggest the following rule of thumb for estimating Internet latency: multiply line-of-sight distance by 2.1, then divide by the speed of light in fiber. But a simple computation of shortest-path lengths through the conduits in the InterTubes map suggests that the conversion factor for all pairs of the 120 largest population centers in the U.S.\ could be reduced from 2.1 to 1.3, in the median, even using less than half of the links. To determine whether an overlay network could be used to provide shortest paths, and how well it would perform, we used the diverse server deployment of a CDN to measure latency across individual conduits. We were surprised to find, however, that latencies are sometimes much higher than would be predicted by conduit length alone. To understand why, we report findings from our analysis of network latency data from the backbones of two Tier-1 ISPs, two scientific and research networks, and the recently built fiber backbone of a CDN.}, }
Endnote
%0 Report %A Bozkurt, Ilker Nadi %A Aqeel, Waqar %A Bhattacherjee, Debopam %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Godfrey, Philip Brighten %A Laughlin, Gregory %A Maggs, Bruce M. %A Singla, Ankit %+ External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations %T Dissecting Latency in the Internet's Fiber Infrastructure : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BFB3-D %U http://arxiv.org/abs/1811.10737 %D 2018 %X The recent publication of the `InterTubes' map of long-haul fiber-optic cables in the contiguous United States invites an exciting question: how much faster would the Internet be if routes were chosen to minimize latency? Previous measurement campaigns suggest the following rule of thumb for estimating Internet latency: multiply line-of-sight distance by 2.1, then divide by the speed of light in fiber. But a simple computation of shortest-path lengths through the conduits in the InterTubes map suggests that the conversion factor for all pairs of the 120 largest population centers in the U.S.\ could be reduced from 2.1 to 1.3, in the median, even using less than half of the links. To determine whether an overlay network could be used to provide shortest paths, and how well it would perform, we used the diverse server deployment of a CDN to measure latency across individual conduits. We were surprised to find, however, that latencies are sometimes much higher than would be predicted by conduit length alone. To understand why, we report findings from our analysis of network latency data from the backbones of two Tier-1 ISPs, two scientific and research networks, and the recently built fiber backbone of a CDN. %K Computer Science, Networking and Internet Architecture, cs.NI
Bhattacherjee, D., Jyothi, S. A., Bozkurt, I. N., Tirmazi, M., Aqeel, W., Aguirre, A., … Singla, A. (2018). cISP: A Speed-of-Light Internet Service Provider. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10897
(arXiv: 1809.10897)
Abstract
Low latency is a requirement for a variety of interactive network applications. The Internet, however, is not optimized for latency. We thus explore the design of cost-effective wide-area networks that move data over paths very close to great-circle paths, at speeds very close to the speed of light in vacuum. Our cISP design augments the Internet's fiber with free-space wireless connectivity. cISP addresses the fundamental challenge of simultaneously providing low latency and scalable bandwidth, while accounting for numerous practical factors ranging from transmission tower availability to packet queuing. We show that instantiations of cISP across the contiguous United States and Europe would achieve mean latencies within 5% of that achievable using great-circle paths at the speed of light, over medium and long distances. Further, we estimate that the economic value from such networks would substantially exceed their expense.
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@online{Bhattacherjee_arXiv1809.10897, TITLE = {{cISP}: {A} Speed-of-Light Internet Service Provider}, AUTHOR = {Bhattacherjee, Debopam and Jyothi, Sangeetha Abdu and Bozkurt, Ilker Nadi and Tirmazi, Muhammad and Aqeel, Waqar and Aguirre, Anthony and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Godfrey, P. Brighten and Laughlin, Gregory P. and Maggs, Bruce M. and Singla, Ankit}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, URL = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10897}, EPRINT = {1809.10897}, EPRINTTYPE = {arXiv}, YEAR = {2018}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, ABSTRACT = {Low latency is a requirement for a variety of interactive network applications. The Internet, however, is not optimized for latency. We thus explore the design of cost-effective wide-area networks that move data over paths very close to great-circle paths, at speeds very close to the speed of light in vacuum. Our cISP design augments the Internet's fiber with free-space wireless connectivity. cISP addresses the fundamental challenge of simultaneously providing low latency and scalable bandwidth, while accounting for numerous practical factors ranging from transmission tower availability to packet queuing. We show that instantiations of cISP across the contiguous United States and Europe would achieve mean latencies within 5% of that achievable using great-circle paths at the speed of light, over medium and long distances. Further, we estimate that the economic value from such networks would substantially exceed their expense.}, }
Endnote
%0 Report %A Bhattacherjee, Debopam %A Jyothi, Sangeetha Abdu %A Bozkurt, Ilker Nadi %A Tirmazi, Muhammad %A Aqeel, Waqar %A Aguirre, Anthony %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Godfrey, P. Brighten %A Laughlin, Gregory P. %A Maggs, Bruce M. %A Singla, Ankit %+ External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations External Organizations %T cISP: A Speed-of-Light Internet Service Provider : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BF14-1 %U http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10897 %D 2018 %X Low latency is a requirement for a variety of interactive network applications. The Internet, however, is not optimized for latency. We thus explore the design of cost-effective wide-area networks that move data over paths very close to great-circle paths, at speeds very close to the speed of light in vacuum. Our cISP design augments the Internet's fiber with free-space wireless connectivity. cISP addresses the fundamental challenge of simultaneously providing low latency and scalable bandwidth, while accounting for numerous practical factors ranging from transmission tower availability to packet queuing. We show that instantiations of cISP across the contiguous United States and Europe would achieve mean latencies within 5% of that achievable using great-circle paths at the speed of light, over medium and long distances. Further, we estimate that the economic value from such networks would substantially exceed their expense. %K Computer Science, Networking and Internet Architecture, cs.NI
Palmer, M., Krüger, T., Chandrasekaran, B., & Feldmann, A. (2018a). The QUIC Fix for Optimal Video Streaming. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10270
(arXiv: 1809.10270)
Abstract
Within a few years of its introduction, QUIC has gained traction: a significant chunk of traffic is now delivered over QUIC. The networking community is actively engaged in debating the fairness, performance, and applicability of QUIC for various use cases, but these debates are centered around a narrow, common theme: how does the new reliable transport built on top of UDP fare in different scenarios? Support for unreliable delivery in QUIC remains largely unexplored. The option for delivering content unreliably, as in a best-effort model, deserves the QUIC designers' and community's attention. We propose extending QUIC to support unreliable streams and present a simple approach for implementation. We discuss a simple use case of video streaming---an application that dominates the overall Internet traffic---that can leverage the unreliable streams and potentially bring immense benefits to network operators and content providers. To this end, we present a prototype implementation that, by using both the reliable and unreliable streams in QUIC, outperforms both TCP and QUIC in our evaluations.
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@online{Palmer_arXiv1809.10270, TITLE = {The {QUIC} Fix for Optimal Video Streaming}, AUTHOR = {Palmer, Mirko and Kr{\"u}ger, Thorben and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Feldmann, Anja}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, URL = {http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10270}, EPRINT = {1809.10270}, EPRINTTYPE = {arXiv}, YEAR = {2018}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, ABSTRACT = {Within a few years of its introduction, QUIC has gained traction: a significant chunk of traffic is now delivered over QUIC. The networking community is actively engaged in debating the fairness, performance, and applicability of QUIC for various use cases, but these debates are centered around a narrow, common theme: how does the new reliable transport built on top of UDP fare in different scenarios? Support for unreliable delivery in QUIC remains largely unexplored. The option for delivering content unreliably, as in a best-effort model, deserves the QUIC designers' and community's attention. We propose extending QUIC to support unreliable streams and present a simple approach for implementation. We discuss a simple use case of video streaming---an application that dominates the overall Internet traffic---that can leverage the unreliable streams and potentially bring immense benefits to network operators and content providers. To this end, we present a prototype implementation that, by using both the reliable and unreliable streams in QUIC, outperforms both TCP and QUIC in our evaluations.}, }
Endnote
%0 Report %A Palmer, Mirko %A Krüger, Thorben %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Feldmann, Anja %+ Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society %T The QUIC Fix for Optimal Video Streaming : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BFC0-E %U http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10270 %D 2018 %X Within a few years of its introduction, QUIC has gained traction: a significant chunk of traffic is now delivered over QUIC. The networking community is actively engaged in debating the fairness, performance, and applicability of QUIC for various use cases, but these debates are centered around a narrow, common theme: how does the new reliable transport built on top of UDP fare in different scenarios? Support for unreliable delivery in QUIC remains largely unexplored. The option for delivering content unreliably, as in a best-effort model, deserves the QUIC designers' and community's attention. We propose extending QUIC to support unreliable streams and present a simple approach for implementation. We discuss a simple use case of video streaming---an application that dominates the overall Internet traffic---that can leverage the unreliable streams and potentially bring immense benefits to network operators and content providers. To this end, we present a prototype implementation that, by using both the reliable and unreliable streams in QUIC, outperforms both TCP and QUIC in our evaluations. %K Computer Science, Networking and Internet Architecture, cs.NI
Palmer, M., Krüger, T., Chandrasekaran, B., & Feldmann, A. (2018b). The QUIC Fix for Optimal Video Streaming. In EPIQ’18, Workshop on the Evolution, Performance, and Interoperability of QUIC. Heraklion, Greece: ACM. doi:10.1145/3284850.3284857
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@inproceedings{Palmer_EPIQ18, TITLE = {The {QUIC} Fix for Optimal Video Streaming}, AUTHOR = {Palmer, Mirko and Kr{\"u}ger, Thorben and Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan and Feldmann, Anja}, LANGUAGE = {eng}, ISBN = {978-1-4503-6082-1}, DOI = {10.1145/3284850.3284857}, PUBLISHER = {ACM}, YEAR = {2018}, MARGINALMARK = {$\bullet$}, DATE = {2018}, BOOKTITLE = {EPIQ'18, Workshop on the Evolution, Performance, and Interoperability of QUIC}, PAGES = {43--49}, ADDRESS = {Heraklion, Greece}, }
Endnote
%0 Conference Proceedings %A Palmer, Mirko %A Krüger, Thorben %A Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan %A Feldmann, Anja %+ Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society %T The QUIC Fix for Optimal Video Streaming : %G eng %U http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BED7-6 %R 10.1145/3284850.3284857 %D 2018 %B Workshop on the Evolution, Performance, and Interoperability of QUIC %Z date of event: 2018-12-04 - 2018-12-04 %C Heraklion, Greece %B EPIQ'18 %P 43 - 49 %I ACM %@ 978-1-4503-6082-1

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